Enable Javscript for better performance
Endravathu Oru Naal Movie Review: Good intentions alone don’t make a film- Cinema express

Endravathu Oru Naal Movie Review: Good intentions alone don’t make a film

Remya and Raghavan deliver one of their better performances, but there is only so much that actors can do when the writing is shallow

   |   
Published: 08th October 2021
Endravathu Oru Naal Movie Review: Good intentions alone don’t make a film

Tragedies are impactful when the pathos hits you unannounced when the loss of the protagonist feels personal. Endravathu Oru Naal fails to achieve both and ends up being a tedious watch, despite decent performances from the leads. The character journeys are predictable here. A couple raising cattle as their children, farmers taking up a 100-day employment scheme to meet ends, and underage children forced into work… These angles aren’t new to cinema. It doesn’t help the predictability of this film that we saw similar storylines in Samuthirakani's Vellai Yaanai and Raame Aandalum Raavane Aandalum just recently. 

Cast: Vidharth, Remya Nambeesan, Master Raghavan

Director: Vetri Duraisamy

Streaming On: ZEE5

Suffering can perhaps be said to be a common emotion through this film. The kindest of people go through the harshest situations in the film, but there is hardly any redemption. Whenever Rasathi (Remya Nambeesan) and her son Murugan (Master Raghavan) hit a roadblock and reach out for help, we know a helping hand won’t be coming, and that their only way is further down. One might argue this is intentional, of course, in order to mirror the plight of farmers in real life. But these series of redundant unfortunate events inflict numbness when they happen over and over again. Composer Raghunanthan attempts to sell the melancholy with his ‘sad’ violin background score, but this only adds to the tedium.

The story revolves around minimal characters in limited locations. The same people meet each other, and their exchanges feel repetitive too. The abduction of the bulls by a money lender is a major plot point of this film and triggers the journey of our protagonists. Ideally, these bulls, perhaps like in Raame Aandalum… should have been treated as lead characters, but they are reduced to props here.

ALSO READ || A Quiet Place Part II Movie Review: An engaging sequel that’s as taut as first part

The saving grace of this film is its portrayal of the grey shade. Even the antagonists aren't blatantly evil. The local moneylender apologises for his misdeed, and the agent who extracts work from the juveniles doesn't go overboard in his abuse of the children. I also liked the way Thanga Muthu's character is written and would have loved to see more of him. Remya and Raghavan deliver one of their better performances, but there is only so much that actors can do when the writing is shallow.

Week in and week out, we see films that show the plight of farmers, trying to rescue their land and cattle. Perhaps it’s time we got some films focussed on the plight of audiences subjected to repetitive stories.

Related Articles

Comments

Disclaimer : We respect your thoughts and views! But we need to be judicious while moderating your comments. All the comments will be moderated by the newindianexpress.com editorial. Abstain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks. Try to avoid outside hyperlinks inside the comment. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines.

The views expressed in comments published on newindianexpress.com are those of the comment writers alone. They do not represent the views or opinions of newindianexpress.com or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The New Indian Express Group, or any entity of, or affiliated with, The New Indian Express Group. newindianexpress.com reserves the right to take any or all comments down at any time.

Poll
TimeTravelFilmsinTamil

Which is your favourite time travel film in Tamil?

Result
Dikkiloona
24
Indru Netru Naalai
Trending