Ramana Avatara Movie Review: Shines with its moral compass but falters in delivering entertainment

Ramana Avatara Movie Review: Shines with its moral compass but falters in delivering entertainment

Though anchored in lofty ideals, the film’s outdated drama, likely due to the prolonged production period, and uneven pacing diminish its impact.
Ramana Avatara(2.5 / 5)

The release of Ramana Avatara was notably delayed but, over the last four years it had been in the making, the makers kept promising to present a modern twist on the classic tale of the Ramayana in a lighthearted manner. Vikas Pampapathy’s vision of the film examines the values of the Ramayana, primarily focusing on Rama (Rishi), affectionately called Gentleman Rama by his villagers. He finds himself unjustly displaced from his village and ends up in Mangalore, where he encounters Pranitha Subhash, who conceals her identity and her whereabouts. Despite their chance encounter, Rama warmly nicknames her Sita and lends assistance during her project interviews, without questioning its purpose.

Director: Vikas Pampapathy
Cast: Rishi, Pranitha Subhash, Arun Sagar, and Shubra Aiyappa

Rama confides in Sita about his aspirations, drawing parallels to exile as well as foreshadowing her abduction and his subsequent rescue mission. Indeed, Sita is kidnapped by a group of thugs, leading Rama to Bengaluru. There, he encounters Alexander (Arun Sagar’s character denoting Ravana) and, with the aid of his friend, akin to Hanuman, orchestrates the rescue of not only Sita but also numerous other girls ensnared by Alexander.
The climax of the tale unfolds upon Rama’s return to his village, where he is hailed as a potential leader and urged to appear as an election candidate. However, Sita, whose real name is Rita, remains disillusioned by gangsters and politics, prompting Rama to question his path: pursue leadership or follow Sita’s wishes. There’s also a short love story in the mix, starring Shubra Aiyappa.

Ramana Avatara attempts to explore the noble traits of Lord Rama through its protagonist, Rama. However, while promising an engaging exploration of these virtues within a modern narrative, the film falls short in delivering entertainment value. Despite glimpses of humour and occasional twists, the execution feels lacking. Director Vikas Pampapathi weaves a contemporary tale echoing the essence of the Ramayana through various characters, yet the absence of key elements, particularly the absence of Lakshmana’s role, dampens the experience. Though anchored in lofty ideals, the film’s outdated drama, likely due to the prolonged production period, and uneven pacing diminish its impact.

While Rishi and Pranitha Subhash offer some respite with their performances, certain aspects, particularly Arun Sagar’s character, prove more annoying than engaging. A couple of medleys by Judah Sandy, which seemed soulful, added depth to the narrative. In essence, Ramana Avatara shines with its moral compass but falters in providing enjoyment and engagement for its audience.

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