Chef Chidambara: Adequately spiced with a dash of dark humour

Chef Chidambara: Adequately spiced with a dash of dark humour

While the film serves up an appetizer of suspense, the abundance of subplots make the narrative overstuffed like a main course full of side dishes
Chef Chidambara(3 / 5)

A cardinal sin in filmmaking is dullness, and director Anand Raj knows it well. His adventurous foray into creating a unique cinema was evident in the experimental Raaghu last year, and this year, he seems to have delved even deeper into moments of quick-wittedness and suspense. With the dark comedy Chef Chidambara, Anand serves up a distinctive recipe centred around a chef who is more than just a cook, presenting a seemingly straightforward thriller infused with a handful of conventional dark comedy ingredients.

Director: Anand Raj

Cast: Aniruddha Jatkar, Nidhi Subaiah, Rachel David, and Sharath Lohittashwa

The film also marks the return of Aniruddha Jatkar to the silver screen in the titular role of Chef Chidambara, who gets entangled in a property dispute. Meanwhile, his chance encounter with Mona, the wife of a former loan shark, throws his life into chaos, setting off a series of unexpected twists.

There are subplots involving an underworld figure searching for his missing smartphone and partner, and a touch of romance with Anu (Rachel David). Following the plot and subplots, secrets unravel, mysteries deepen, and alliances shift, leaving Chidambara grappling with unforeseen challenges. The crux of the film lies in Mona's proposition to Chidambara and the don's collaboration with a corrupt cop (Sharath Lohitashwa). However, while the thriller attempts to spice things up, the dark comedy aspect may not keep audiences on the edge.

Nevertheless, director Anand Raj showcases his knack for dark comedy, a rarity in Kannada cinema. A film made in under two hours, Chef Chidambara breezes through with several humorous moments and witty dialogue, ensuring some laughs.

Aniruddha, who gained popularity through serials, returns to the silver screen, portraying the chef in his style and even engaging in action scenes. Joining him are Nidhi Subaiah and Rachel David, spicing things up, accompanied by Ritwik Muralidhar's music and Uday Leela's cinematography.

While the film serves up an appetizer of suspense, the abundance of subplots make the narrative overstuffed, like a main course full of side dishes, and this may leave viewers craving a more focused narrative. Ultimately, it is up to the audience to decide whether or not to savour the main course that is Chef Chidambara.

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